Category: fedora (Page 1 of 6)

Fedora’s revised mission

Coming up with convincing vision and mission in a corporate environment is never easy – in fact, I think it’s one of the most difficult things you can do. Setting a clear and crisp vision is crucial to create an aligned organisation. Refining down into an elevator-pitch sized statement while avoiding generalisations, platitudes and (frankly) abstract jibberish is practically impossible. Doing so outside a corporate environment I think is even more difficult – money is at least a straightforward motivation to hang a hat on.

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A business plan for Ubuntu

Back in 2010 I wrote a post about Canonical’s business direction, in response to something Bradley Kuhn had posted. Both he and I were worried about Canonical becoming reliant on an “open core” business model – worried not just from the perspective that it would dilute the principle of Ubuntu, but that frankly every time I have seen this executed before it has been a dismal failure.

The posts are worth re-reading in the context of Mark Shuttleworth’s announcement today that Ubuntu will be dropping a number of their in-house technologies and, more importantly, abandoning the explicit goal of convergence. I would also say, read the comments on the blogs – both Bradley and I found it deeply strange that Canonical wouldn’t follow the RHEL-like strategy, which we both thought they could execute well (and better than an open core one).

Of course, our confusion was – in hindsight – obvious. We weren’t seeing the wood for the trees. The strategy has since been spelled out by Simon Wardley in his rather good talks; one example is here:

It’s well worth to take the time to watch that and understand the strategy against RedHat; but it’s pretty easy to state: “Own the future, wait for it to come to us”. Let’s see why this is important.

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What I realised I’m missing from Gnome

Not that long ago, I did a switch on my Android phone: against all the promises I made to myself beforehand, I switched on the Google account and allowed it to sync up to GCHQ/NSA the cloud. I did this for one main reason: I had just got an Android tablet, and I despised having to do the same stuff on each device, particularly since they weren’t running the same versions of Android, and one was a Nexus – so not all the UI was the same.

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A first look at docker.io

In my previous post about virtualenv, I took a look at a way of making python environments a little bit more generic so that they could be moved around and redeployed at ease. I mentioned docker.io as a new tool that uses a general concept of “containers” to do similar things, but more broadly. I’ve dug a bit into docker, and these are my initial thoughts. Unfortunately, it seems relatively Fedora un-friendly right now.

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packaging a virtualenv: really not relocatable

My irregular readers will notice I haven’t blogged in ages. For the most part, I’ve been putting that effort into writing a book – more about this next week – hopefully back to normal service now though. Recently I’ve been trying to bring an app running on a somewhat-old Python stack slightly more up-to-date. When this app was developed, the state of the art in terms of best practice was to use operating system packaging – RPM, in this case – as the means by which the application and its various attendant libraries would be deployed.

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Is package management failing Fedora users?

(For those looking for an rpm rant, sorry, this isn’t it….!) Currently there’s a ticket in front of FESCo asking whether or not alternative dependency solvers should be allowed in Fedora’s default install. For those who don’t know, the dependency solver is the algorithm which picks the set of packages to install/remove when a user requests something. So, for example, if the user asks for Firefox to be installed, the “depsolver” is the thing which figures out which other packages Firefox needs in order to work.

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Speculation on Google’s “Dart”

Just yesterday people jumped on the biographies and abstract for a talk at goto: the Keynote is Google’s first public information on Dart, a “structured programming language for the world-wide web”. Beyond knowing a couple of the engineers involved – which allows a certain amount of inference to take place – there’s also some speculation that Dart is what this “Future of Javascript” email referred to as “Dash” (this seems entirely possible: a dash language already exists; Google already used ‘Dart’ for an advertising product but have since stopped using that name, potentially to make way for the language).

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The quality of Fedora releases

Scott James Remnant blogged his ideas about how to improve the quality of Ubuntu releases recently, triggering some discussion at LWN about the topic. I offered some opinions about Ubuntu which are not terribly interesting because I don’t get to use it often; however, I did also write about Fedora based on the last couple months’ experience of Fedora 15 & 16. Before I get to that, at roughly the same time, Doug Ledford was posting his thoughts about the “critical path” process – essentially, saying it was broken.

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Who can program?

Over the past couple of weeks, I’ve been pondering the above question for a number of different reasons. For people who really study programming, like I attempt to, there are a number of claims/myths/legends/tales that are commonly held about people who cut code for a living, such as: some programmers, the “alphas”, are as much as ten times more efficient than the common programmer; there are people who “get” computers, and those who don’t.

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Short thoughts on the riots.

Last night, we decided to order pizza – we don’t do it often, it’s lazy but sort of a treat. However, out of the three local well-known places, only one was open: the other two had shut down early. Now, we don’t live in London per se, but Croydon (where there were major fires and a member of the public was shot just a night ago) is only a few miles east, and Clapham a few miles north.

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